The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (Hitchhiker #1)

HitchhikersThe Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
My rating: 2.5 out of 5 stars

The story of the last morning of the Earth, over England anyways, and how with the help of a stranded alien (Ford Prefect) he was friends with the last man (Arthur Dent) survived the planet’s end begins the first story of the Hitchhiker’s series.  But the story quickly introduces the President of the Galaxy, Zaphod Beeblebrox, and his confederate Trillian, who happens to now be the last female from Earth, along with their depressed android Marvin aboard the Heart of Gold (which Zaphod stole at the launching ceremony).

After attempting to save his house from demolition for a new bypass, Arthur just gets off the planet when the alien Vogon demolition the Earth to make way for a new interstellar bypass.  Learning on the fly and in the depths of an alien, one of the Vogon, he learns his friend is actually an alien who has been stranded on Earth then quickly finds himself jettison from airlock and improbably saved by the passing Heart of Gold.  Then Arthur finds him on a mysterious planet inhabited by a race that actually constructed Earth as a massive computer to find “The Question” to “The Answer” to the “Life, the Universe, and Everything”, commissioned by mice 10 million years ago.

The whip around style of the adventure and funny entries of the titular guide are the highlights of this first story of the series.  Unfortunately, we hardly get to know any of the characters very much and besides the guide entries, the humor is somewhat bland with only a few times were smiles crossed my face.  Overall it’s an okay story, but if it wasn’t for the fact that I’m reading an omnibus edition and the big fandom on the ‘net I wonder if I would even be interested in seeking out other stories.

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The New World Order: What’s Behind the Headlines?

The New World Order: What's Behind the Headlines?The New World Order: What’s Behind the Headlines? by Russell Burrill
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

With the end of the Cold War, many were stunned at the sudden changes in the geo-political world as well the religious world and what it meant for last-day events. The New World Order: What’s Behind the Headlines? was written by Russell Burrill in the early 1990s as an answer to many questions Adventists and evangelical Christians had about the rapid changes witness in the previous years.

Adapting his seminars into book form, Burrill reviews with the reader events that have shaped the titular “new world order” before turning their attention to the Books of Daniel and Revelation. Although Burrill does cover chapters 2 and 7 of Daniel, his major focus is on chapter 11 which for many is a confusing series of attacks by the king of the north and the king of the south against one another. However, for the first time in my own reading and studying Burrill gives a very understanding answer to the prophetic events happening in this chapter. Burrill also provides for the reader connections from chapter 11 of Daniel to many prophetic events written about in Revelations.

Burrill aims to give an overall picture of the events written about in Daniel and Revelation in relation to last-day events and what appear to be trends at the time of his written that seem to be pointing to the ultimate outcome as specified in Biblical prophecy. However, Burrill avoids talking specifically about dates and times, instead focusing on things occurring on the national, international, and religious landscapes that appeared at the time to be trending to prophetic events. Yet the now 25 year difference between the book’s publication and today does change the way the reader looks at the book. But while some sections of the book are out-of-date, Burrill’s emphasis of examining the prophetic writing of Daniel and Revelation continues to be the strongest part of this book.

The New World Order was published with a catchy-name for what can sometimes be an “uncatchy” subject for many. While the titular phrase now has many different means for many people from conspiracy theorists to wrestling fans, for those looking for the ultimate in a changed new world order with the Second Coming of Jesus Christ this book gives some answers to questions about last-day events.

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The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (Modern Library Volume 3 of 3)

The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 3The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 3 by Edward Gibbon
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The finale volume of Modern Library’s three-volume reprint of Edward Gibbon’s The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire covers chapters 49 through 71 of the author’s vast magnum opus. Beginning with the Iconoclast controversy in correlation with rise of the Vatican and Holy Roman Empire in the 8th century and ending with a description of the causes and progression of the decay of the city of Roman in the 15th century, Gibbon relates in detail the political, martial, social, and theological developments in both Europe and the Middle East ultimately led to the end of Byzantine Empire with the fall of Constantinople to the Ottomans and the state of the city of Roman at time of the Roman Empire’s complete end.

The majority of the 22 chapters deal with the rise of Islam and the resultant political and martial effects that would ultimately determine the fate of the Byzantine Empire. Although beginning with the Iconoclastic controversy that began the schism of the Christian church as the bishop of Rome rose to power in the West, Gibbon used those developments to launch into how Islam rose in Arabia then spread across not only areas once under Roman control but also their long-time Persian rivals in the aftermath of the reconquests of Heraclius. While detailing the internal struggle within the Caliphate period, Gibbon reveals how Emperors attempted to combat this new faith and military force to increasing little effect has time went on.

The thorough retelling of the numerous political changes throughout Asia that affect the fortunes of the Byzantine Empire shifted the focus away from the ‘Roman’ world to locations as far east as China, but revolutions of people in these areas would play into the fortunes of Constantinople. Also playing into fate of Byzantine was the barbarian Christian West that the Emperors called for aid not only from kings but the Pope as well. Unfortunately the resulting Crusades and mercenary arms that went East would inflict a mortal wound to the Empire in 1204 thus beginning a centuries long death spiral that only lasted as long as it did because of internal revolutions with the growing Ottoman Empire until 1453. This dreary recounting of the end of Byzantium is mirrored by Gibbon in his recounting of the history of the city of Rome itself throughout the Middle Ages until the fall of the New Rome in the East.

This finale volume of Gibbon’s life consuming work revealed the struggle of the Eastern Empire of Byzantium to continue against a succession of Islamic powers and its ultimate demise thus completing the fall of the Roman Empire. Yet in retelling the eventual fall of Constantinople, Gibbon paints a huge picture for the reader about how events both near and far away from the Bosporus affected the fortunes for both good and ill of the New Rome. And in recounting the history of the city of Rome throughout the Middle Ages, a reader sheds a tear with Gibbon about the loss of the monuments of both Republic and Empire due to the necessity or vanity of the people of Rome after for the fall of the Western Empire.

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National Sunday Law

National Sunday LawNational Sunday Law by A. Jan Marcussen
My rating: 0.5 of 5 stars

When I read this book, I knew what my review would be just not how to begin it and finally decided honesty is the best policy.

I am a Seventh-day Adventist and the topic of this book focuses on what Seventh-day Adventists believe is a central part of last day events before Christ’s Second Coming. Unfortunately, the author has produced such a horribly written book as to induce cringe worthy level of embarrassment to any mainstream Adventist. And to learn that it was left at people’s doors or mailed to them anonymously makes its impact even worse because while I believe the author was sincere in wanting to do good; I will not vouch for the ideas presented because fairly early in the book I began skimming through and will never read it for a second time.

This book is not in any way affiliated with the Seventh-day Adventist church and the publication company is named as to be confused with a genuine evangelistic ministry.

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The Collected Poems of Emily Dickinson

The Collected Poems of Emily DickinsonThe Collected Poems of Emily Dickinson by Emily Dickinson
My rating: 2.5 of 5 stars

The Collected Poems of Emily Dickinson contains a sizeable sample of the total works of the reclusive poet, who only came to prominence after her death. Containing 593 poems separated into five different themes, roughly a third of her overall productivity, this collection gives the reader a wonderful look into the talent of a woman who hid her art not only from the world but also her own family. Besides nearly 600 poems of Dickinson’s work, the reader is given a 25 page introduction to the poet and an analysis of her work by Dr. Rachel Wetzsteon who helps reveal the mysterious artist as best as she can and help the reader understand her work better. Although neither Wetzsteon’s introduction and analysis nor Dickinson’s work is wanting, the fact that this collection gives only a sample of the poet’s work is its main and only flaw.

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The Millennium Bug: Is This the End of the World as We Know It?

The Millennium Bug: Is This the End of the World as We Know It?The Millennium Bug: Is This the End of the World as We Know It? by Jon Paulien
My rating: 2.5 of 5 stars

The world approached the year 2000, the threat of disaster due to a glitch in programming to our technological world was all the rage in the media only to fizzle out. However Jon Paulien’s The Millennium Bug is not about Y2K, but about how Christians—more specifically Seventh-day Adventists—should approach the then upcoming calendar change to 2000 when thinking about the “end times”.

Almost 20 years ago, the world was getting both excited and anxious about the upcoming new millennium. Besides the magically alluring numeral 2000, there were questions about if the change would adversely affect computers causing chaos and to many Christians if this change in millennium would see Jesus’ Second Coming. Paulien examines all the theories surrounding the millennium with the Second Coming and why Adventists with their history of Great Disappointment were even getting infected with “the millennium bug”. Yet while Paulien was informative with all the reasons why the calendar change to 2000 was just artificial especially in light of what occurred leading up to the year 1000, when he turned to what Adventists should concentrate on when thinking about “the end times” a lot of his writing would suggest checking out his a previous book of his on that subject instead of giving complete answers in this particular book.

While this fact was a tad frustrating, Paulien went a long way in answer many question dealing and surrounding various ‘end time’ theories in which millenniums are involved whether dealing with the age of the Earth or when the millennium of Revelation occurs. The Millennium Bug isn’t perfect and in parts a bit dated, it is still a good quick read of information.

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Blood Brothers

Blood BrothersBlood Brothers by Philip G. Samaan
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The world’s three great monotheistic religions all come from the same physical location and the same heritage, yet they are each other’s throats with no hope in sight. Philip Samaan in Blood Brothers examines the relationships between Jews, Muslims, and Christians not only today but in the past through Biblical and secular history.

The sons, both physical and spiritual, of Abraham have much in common but today can’t seem to get along and shed blood without a thought. Yet, Samaan breaks new ground in helping everyone understand the issues over the course of millennia that drove them apart from one another enough to think of the “others” as enemies instead of brothers. Once the issues were covered and explained, Samaan then turns to show how these brothers can come together through the Seed of Abraham, Christ Jesus.

As a native-born Syrian, Samaan is familiar not only with all three religions but has first-hand experiences with many Biblical examples of the vine and the olive tree from his childhood on his family’s farm. But as a long-time missionary with experience around the world with Jews and Muslims, his personal experiences of showing his Christian faith to them and the conversations are a strong part of this book. But written in the early 1990s, Blood Brothers shows it’s age as Samaan focuses more on Christian evangelistic efforts towards Jews. This is because at the time Hal Lindsey’s The Late Great Planet Earth was presenting an end time scenario that is contradictory to that found in the Bible influencing many Christian denominations, except for Seventh-day Adventists. Almost 25 years later, the “battle” between Muslims and the West shows the age of Blood Brothers.

In around 140 pages, Blood Brothers present the issues that have divided the sons of Abraham over the centuries. But Samaan reveals how to bridge these divisions and how to the Seed of Abraham is the hope of all of his sons. Even though the shows it’s age in it comes to the world stage, it doesn’t take away from the importance of the answers Samaan gives.

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