Dr. No (James Bond #1)

Dr. NoDr. No
My rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars

The film that launched the James Bond franchise, Dr. No, not only introduced the world to James Bond but also was the breakout role Sean Connery. Based on the sixth novel by Ian Fleming of the same name, this film created the motifs that would last throughout the franchise.

In brief, the plot of the film follows James Bond as he looks into the disappearance of the MI6 resident in Jamaica and his secretary, who were seen getting murdered at the beginning of the film. Upon his arrival on the island, Bond is followed by several agents of the titular Dr. No and Felix Leiter, a CIA agent working with the missing MI6 agent to investigate mysterious radio interference with NASA rockets. Through various clues, Bond realizes one of the last men to see his missing colleague in the employ of Dr. No and hid the fact that samples the MI6 agent asked for analysis were radioactive. Bond slips onto the Dr. No’s private island and finding Honey Ryder collecting seashells. Captured by the island’s security, Bond and No verbally square off before the Doctor has enough and has Bond put in a cell. Escaping the cell, Bond infiltrates No’s control center that contained a nuclear reactor that he overloads then throws No into the reactor pool. Finding Ryder, Bond escapes the island and is found by Leiter onboard a Royal Navy ship.

The film’s plot is serviceable though nothing spectacular. Yet, what makes the film click and smooth over the rough edges of the plot is Connery. Although today it’s cliché that Connery and Bond are synonymous, but honestly if any other actor were to have been on screen or delivered lines than it just feels that the faults of the plot would have become more glaring. The action sequences and some very good shots, especially in the relation to No’s ‘Three Blind Mice’ assassins in background shots following Bond in several scenes helped give the film some added tension. As I stated several motifs associated with the Bond franchise first appeared, namely the gun barrel opening, the stylized main title sequence, and the Bond’s signature introduction; but luckily the gadget motif that became fantastically elaborate as the franchise progressed was nowhere to be seen.

Honestly, I had a hard time on how to rate this Dr. No. It isn’t perfect and has some plot holes, most importantly how does a nuclear reactor play into radio jamming of rockets, so it would not be a 5-star film but because of its success it spawned a franchise that has spanned 24 films over 55 years it had to be better than 2 ½. And unlike Gojira, there was no nuance that could make up for the film’s faults. So I feel that 3 ½ is a good rating for the first Bond film given it’s imperfects and its influential significance.

James Bond Film Page

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