The Rogue Prince (ASOIAF- History)

RoguesThe Rogue Prince, or, A King’s Brother by George R.R. Martin
My rating: 2.5 out of 5 stars

One of the major political and military individuals in the Targaryen Civil War, also known as The Dance of the Dragons, Prince Dameon Targaryen etched his name into the history of Westeros well before he fought for his wife’s right to the Iron Throne. Living almost two hundred years before the main events of George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire, “The Rogue Prince” details the life of a man who was grandson and brother to kings as well as father and grandfather of kings in a line that leads to present.

Daemon Targaryen is a man whose actions would have ramifications for centuries to come, yet in his own biography he is overshadowed by the events and happenings that would lead to The Dance of the Dragons. Yet while most of the text focused on the background to the war Daemon would fight, events of his life that continued to shape Westeros were explored. After failed stints on the small council, Daemon would take charge of the city watch of King’s Landing and reform them to become the Gold Cloaks. Daemon’s alliance with House Velaryon in war, marriage, and politics that would have a profound effect on the later war and it’s aftermath. And Daemon’s rivalry with Hand of the King Otto Hightower over his brother entire reign that gave the King no end of trouble.

Written as a history of events leading up to The Dance in the form of a biography by an Archmaester of the Citadel, Martin mimics many popular biographies of the present day in writing this fictional history. Like many biographies of major players in the American Civil War in which the chain of events and movements that lead to the Civil War at times takes over the biography, Martin’s “The Rogue Prince” follows the lead up to the Targaryen Civil War more than the titular subject yet in a very intriguing way that makes the reader wish Marin might one day write an actual story of one of Daemon’s great adventures or misdeeds.

“The Rogue Prince” is both like and essentially a prequel to “The Princess and the Queen”, a vivid retelling of history of events that surprisingly do connect with George R.R. Martin’s main series as well. However, instead of following the promised roguish Daemon the history is not a biography but a backdoor history text that chronicles the events over the years that lead to The Dance of the Dragons. Thus even though an avid reader of history I enjoyed this piece, the focus away from the roguish titular character leaves something to be desired of the whole.

The Lightning Tree (The Kingkiller Chronicle #0.5)

RoguesThe Lightning Tree by Patrick Rothfuss
My rating: 4 out of 5 stars

The story follows mysterious errand boy from the Waystone Inn, Bast, throughout an entire day as he has dealings with many children from the area surrounding the town of Newarre. Bast offers answers to questions and problems that the children have in return for information or favors as well as trading information for information, but most of his time is helping a young boy named Rike get rid of his abusive father from his home. Yet while the children think they are dealing with an teenager, the reader is quick to realize that Bast is something other than human and more than just a teenager. Bast’s roguishness is hard to miss and the story is very good making this a great penultimate story for the overall volume.

Now Showing

RoguesNow Showing by Connie Willis
My rating: 2 out of 5 stars

Lindsay loves old movies and enjoys good movies, as did her former boyfriend Jack before he got expelled just before he graduated. After months of not going to the Movie Drome, she’s convinced by her friends to watch some movies but she only agrees if they actually watch movies. It turns out Lindsay is a rare individual in this near-future world of 100 screen movie theaters, someone who actually wants to watch films not go to all the movie-themed restaurants and stores housed in the Drome. When she bumps into Jack, Lindsay’s evening is basically shot and she learns about a conspiracy of fraud. But while the mysterious intrigues of the Drome are interesting to explore, Lindsay letting herself be treated like all ladies that “date” scoundrels in movies undermines everything. For over half the story, I wanted Lindsay to sucker punch Jack but instead they had sex while Jack got some evidence of his fraud conspiracy. My rating is more of the ideas and the detailing the near-future world than the story and characters.

How the Marquis Got His Coat Back (Neverwhere)

RoguesHow the Marquis Got His Coat Back by Neil Gaiman
My rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars

The Marquis de Carabas died, but he’s currently getting better though when he came to his coat was gone. The Marquis begins searching throughout London Below, however he has to contend with various consequences to his past actions. Yet while dealing with those consequences, the Marquis uses the actions of others to his own advantage to get out of scraps and eventually get his coat back. Although the reader probably needs to read Neverwhere┬áto get a better idea of the world, Gaiman adequately gives the reader a sense of London Below but not as good as some other authors have done which is why the rating is a little low.

The Curious Affair of the Dead Wives

RoguesThe Curious Affair of the Dead Wives by Lisa Tuttle
My rating: 3 out of 5 stars

Miss Lane interviews a new client, a little girl named Felicity who has seen her dead older half-sister (Alcinda) standing above her mother’s grave before being pulled away by a disagreeable gentleman who scared her. Although Lane isn’t hopeful after receiving the dead half-sister’s diary, her partner Mr. Jasper Jesperson seems intrigued by coded message that the half-sister left at the end of the diary that he decoded. The two detectives journey to the dead young woman’s cemetery and end up at her undertaker’s home in which they find mother and several “wives” including the unfortunate Alcinda who they rescue. Yet at the end of the story, even the protagonists wonder who the real rogue was in the case. This little mystery was a nice change of pace within the anthology as well homage to Doyle’s Holmes and Watson with a unique twist. I only wish there was more story to the story.

The Caravan to Nowhere (Tales of Alaric the Minstrel)

RoguesThe Caravan to Nowhere by Phyllis Eisenstein
My rating: 2.5 out of 5 stars

Alaric the Minstrel is hired to join a merchant caravan across the desert to perform entertainment for the men, but from the start his employer warns him about his own son. It turns out the young man is unbalanced, wanting to chase after the mirage of the “Lost City” but is always looked after by his father as well as his men. However, both Alaric and the merchant learn that some of the men are upset at this arrangement and one looks to take over the trade of a very valuable drug as well as getting rid of the kid. Alaric’s ability comes in handy to save not only his life the merchant’s as well, but the merchant’s son is left to chase after his life’s pursuit. The story was fine and upon finishing a tad predictable, but there wasn’t really a “roguish” feel to it though.

Diamonds from Tequila

RoguesDiamonds from Tequila by Walter Jon Williams
My rating: 3 out of 5 stars

Sean Makin, a former child-star who suffers from a physical deformity, is shooting his feature film in Mexico along side his “tabloid girlfriend”. However, things suddenly go south when he finds his “girlfriend” dead in her room and film’s production & quality is put in jeopardy. Sean finds himself navigating Mexican authorities, DEA agents, and a shadowy prop assistant who has found ingenious uses for a 3D printer. Sean finds himself bribing local Mexican police to shot at windows then meeting a drug lord and then confront the man who accidentally killed his “girlfriend” to extort money from his corporate employers in an effort to save his one shot at a stable acting career. The story features several types of rogues and is very good, but sections of Sean’s thoughts require you to have read Williams’ book The Fourth Wall which lowered the rating.