Redemption in Genesis: The Crossroads of Faith and Reason

b0073xicny.01._sx450_sy635_sclzzzzzzz_Redemption in Genesis: the Crossroads of Faith and Reason by John S. Nixon
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The Bible is all about Jesus, he is pointed to or followed in every book, but Scripture begins in Genesis and within its well-known stories John S. Nixon reveals Christ and the plan of Redemption. Although many might say that eight passages covered by Nixon—Creation, Adam and Eve, Cain and Abel, Enoch, Noah, and three events from the life of Abraham—show Jesus or aspects of the plan of Redemption, Nixon doesn’t touch the surface but truly goes deeper. As a part of this depth, Nixon begins his book by explaining that a 21st Century believe must use both reason and faith but only if the latter comes first. With this approach the reader must be ready for a very thought-provoking study, however Nixon doesn’t overwhelm the reader with overly theological prose but presents his in-depth study in very reader-friendly wording. Though deceptively short at around 160 pages, this book will take time to read but it is worth it.

Rebellion and Redemption

fca3376cb15750a597044467367444341587343Rebellion and Redemption Bible Book Shelf 1Q 2016 by David Tasker
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The Great Controversy began before Creation and will be finished at the end of the millennium, the conflict between God and Satan permeates throughout the Bible from beginning to end. In David Tasker’s Rebellion and Redemption shows throughout 128 pages how God used fallible human begins, who had fallen into rebellion, to push forward His plan of redemption that lead to the birth of Christ. Following Christ’s ministry on Earth sealed the fate of Satan, His Apostles then did their part to establish the Church so it could spread throughout the world so all could have a chance before God brings about the end of the Controversy and reestablishes the perfect Earth of Creation. This short book gives the reader a overview of the Great Controversy through the lens of scripture that will want to make you explore it more in-depth.

Laying Down the Law

838575003add3ff596b43307177444341587343Laying Down the Law by Keith Augustus Burton
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

One of the most contentious issues debated between Christian theologians is “the Law” and its place within Christianity. In Laying Down the Law, Keith Augustus Burton looks at the misconceptions surrounding God’s Law and puts the spotlight on it’s real meaning, love. Through 157 pages Burton tackles such topics as legalism, dispensationalism, the meaning of Paul’s writing on the Law, and so much more over 13 chapters using Bible verses, the culture of biblical times, and personal stories that begin and end each chapter to illustrate the topic covered. After reading this book, one will see God’s Law in whole new light.

The Book of Acts

7845427d445908d5976364a7177444341587343The Book of Acts by Wilson Paroschi
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The Acts of the Apostles follows the men who in three decades totally changed the world by spreading the gospel of Christ first in Jerusalem then Judea and Samaria and finally to the entire world. Wilson Paroschi’s The Book of Acts is a supplement for the Adult Sabbath School Bible Study Guide (3rd Quarter) of the same name and at 128 pages is not intended to be commentary on Acts, but it is a valuable study guide regardless if you starting the Bible with or without the corresponding Sabbath School Quarterly. And for further study, Paroschi ends the book with a list of recommendations for further study of not only Acts and the events that take place but the early Church as well.

Romans: Salvation for “All”

RomansRomans: Salvation for All by George R Knight
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The Epistle of Romans is the most evangelistic book of the New Testament as the Apostle Paul gave to the church in Rome and every reader since a the best explanation of the good news of Jesus Christ’s death and resurrection. George R. Knight’s commentary Romans: Salvation for “All” not only gives the background of the book, but also a clarification of what Paul means throughout his multi-layered sermon. Meant to be read alongside the Epistle, in which the reader can examine the Old Testament verses that Paul quotes extensively, this commentary allows the reader a deeper and all-encompassing understanding of the message that Paul is giving the reader in its correct context. An excellent book that comes in at only 127 pages.

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