My Turn: A Life of Total Football

My Turn: A Life of Total FootballMy Turn: A Life of Total Football by Johan Cruyff

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I received this book via Goodreads First Reads in exchange for an honest review.

Total Football burst into the popular consciousness with the Dutch national team at the 1974 World Cup led by Johan Cruyff. In Cruyff’s posthumously published autobiography My Turn, the former player and manager talks about the course and evolution of his entire life in football as well after his time actively involved in the sport.

Cruyff is upfront from the outset that he won’t recount every big match, for him the important thing was the development of technique and the evolution of getting better by learning from successes and failures. However, Cruyff’s explanation of his development as a player as well as the style he both played and coached are a fascinating read in which the results of certain matches come in to play. Cruyff’s stories about growing up at Ajax from a ball boy then through the developmental system give a insight about how talent is developed over in Europe, especially once he explains what he took away from how talent was developed in the United States when he played in the NASL. Yet, the most interesting stories were Cruyff’s time at Barcelona and the politics of Catalonia and Spain were a literal culture shock to him and his family.

The latter part of the book covers Cruyff’s most “controversial” time in football, his managerial tenures at Ajax and Barcelona as well as the shakeups to both clubs that he was an advisor for to bring them both to prominence. Cruyff is upfront about his thought about his loathing of boardroom managing the pitch in place of the pitch dictating the boardroom. For Cruyff this direction from on high, especially at Ajax is one of the reasons that the style of Total Football that he advocates is no longer seen in Dutch football as both technique and fundamentals instilled at an early age are never truly developed because of the increasing change of trainers and development personal because of agendas of non-football individuals who have an agenda of their own. This critique of money interfering goes handed in hand with Cruyff’s explanation of his preferred style of football as well as a rather informative explanation of the tactics of football is easy to understand even for those uninformed about the game.

Although My Turn seems to have been cut short by Cruyff’s death in March 2016, it is still a wonderful read for anyone interest in football or sports biographies.

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Get in the Game: 8 Elements of Perseverance That Make the Difference

Get in the Game: 8 Elements of Perseverance That Make the DifferenceGet in the Game: 8 Elements of Perseverance That Make the Difference by Cal Ripken Jr.
My rating: 3.5 of 5 stars

While “Get in the Game” is listed as a self-help/business on the cover, it reads like a mini-autobiography of Cal Ripken, Jr.  Ripken, with the assistance of Donald T. Phillips, writes about eight elements that he attributed in not only making a difference in his legendary baseball career but also his successful transition to business.  Within each of the eight chapters detailing each element, Ripken shares stories and situations from his early life and baseball career that are examples of the featured element.  At the end of the book, Ripken his a brief overview of his post-baseball life and how the eight elements have influenced his transition into business.  At less than 300 pages, the book reads quick but is very thought provoking.

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Baseball’s Creation Myth: Adam Ford, Abner Graves and the Cooperstown Story

Baseball's Creation Myth: Adam Ford, Abner Graves and the Cooperstown StoryBaseball’s Creation Myth: Adam Ford, Abner Graves and the Cooperstown Story by Brian Martin
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I received this book via LibraryThing Early Reviewers in exchange for an honest review.

The mythologized and debunked tale of General Abner Doubleday’s invention of baseball in Cooperstown, New York is the focus of Baseball’s Creation Myth by Brian Martin.  The story behind the Doubleday-Cooperstown tale brings into the spotlight three men who inspired it, who spun it, and who promoted it.  Martin tells about the lives of these three men along with the social and political times they lived in when the Cooperstown story was birthed.

Martin centers his book on the lives of Adam Ford, Abner Graves, and Albert Goodwell Spalding.  Although several other individuals for a few pages do become the focus, it is these three that propel the narrative on how the Cooperstown story came to be and of how of all places Denver, Colorado is where it germinated.  Martin explains that the backdrop of the patriotic and optimistic times of the first decade of the 1900s under Theodore Roosevelt, in which the story is first introduced, is why it became such a fixed fact of Americana.  And Martin explains the different paths Cooperstown and its Canadian counterpart St. Mary’s became homes to their nation’s respective Halls of Fame.

The understanding of both Ford and Graves is center to Martin’s text and their lives and experiences are examined throughout the book especially their relationship to baseball.  A few times Martin does take side streets in his text, most notably when discussing Mark Twain’s experiences in Virginia City.  However for the most part Martin sticks to building what he believes to be a very reasonable, though admittedly circumstantial, case on the Cooperstown story was conceived and took root.

Having no real clue about what to expect from this book, I found it enjoyable read on how a mythical event of Americana came to be as well on the lives of two ordinary men who played a part in how it came about.

Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book for review from LibraryThing.

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Controversy Creates Cash

Controversy Creates CashControversy Creates Cash by Eric Bischoff
My rating: 3.5 of 5 stars

In Controversy Creates Cash, former WCW executive Eric Bischoff gives his side of the story against a decades worth of bad press he received in the Internet Wrestling Community.  Bischoff quickly starts off by setting the record straight on some of his early life and how he got into the wrestling business in AWA.  Then goes through his ups and downs in WCW before leading the organization even coming close to quitting and going to Hollywood.  Once in charge of WCW, Bischoff explains his philosophy to make the organization successful and how he implemented it.  Bischoff also discussed how in 3 1/2 years, WCW went from being a multi-million dollar property to being sold for chum change and all the factors that led to it.

From the outset, Bischoff tells he readers he knows they come into reading autobiographies that they expect shameless self-promotion and/or b.s.  While Bischoff tries to avoid this, he’s still guilty of doing this, more so on the self-promotion than on the b.s. though.  Bischoff repeatedly brings up the “dirt sheet” writers and after a while it gets old, but one can tell that he feels they were the one most responsible for giving false information about him.  Throughout the book, Bischoff does discuss some famous situations in which he had been cast as the villain, but instead of going all defensive Bischoff is very balanced.  If in retrospect Bischoff believes he mishandled a situation he lets the reader know, but he never throws a wrestler “under the bus” however if it was a corporate officer Bischoff takes them to task.

My opinion of this book changed throughout my reading of it, the first half of the book I was very positive but the majority of the latter part of the book I felt only so-so especially as Bischoff really let his frustrations show that even his co-author couldn’t improve upon.  But considering that Eric Bischoff is the top five individuals ever in pro wrestler, I recommend this book.

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The Hardcore Diaries

The Hardcore DiariesThe Hardcore Diaries by Mick Foley
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The Hardcore Diaries is my first taste of Mick Foley’s writing and I found it enjoyable reading.  Foley has a conversational style of writing that is easy to follow, even with not to perfect grammar like tense changes, especially as he’s describing what he’s best known for actions within the squared circle.  Although the book’s main theme of storyline conception to completion is fascinating and Foley’s emotional roller coaster connected is great, I found his side stories fun, enjoyable, and humbling additions.  Though Foley’s repeated references to a porn star and chair shots to the head do get a little tiring close to the end of the book, overall I usually glossed over them.  Given this is my first Mick Foley book, I very interested to read his first two biographical efforts which seemed to more regarded than The Hardcore Diaries.

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